Solving the Health Problems with Bissap

Hibiscus has long been used for the treatment of many health problems in Africa, high blood pressure and complaints of the liver. In the Western world it was mainly used as a seasoning in the composition of herbal tea. Now people are convinced of their blood pressure lowering properties. Bissap is very rich in: protein, lipid, minerals and vitamin C and is also an antioxidant.

Properties of hibiscus (bissap):

  • Cholesterol and triglyceride lowering
  • Moisturizing
  • Liver protection
  • Powerful antioxidant
  • Degreasing on the bladder and urinary tract
  • Reducing blood pressure
  • Reduces blood

Recipe: juice from bissap for 2 liters of juice

Ingredients:

200 gr hibiscus (bissap)

2 sachets of vanilla sugar

250 gr sugar

Pre-order of the recipe:

Step 1: wash the flowers and place them in a pan with 2 liters of water and boil for 20 minutes until the water is pink / red.

Step 2: Cool for 10 minutes and then remove the bissap flowers with a sieve

Step 3: Add the sugar and vanilla sugar to taste and mix well

Step 5: Put in the refrigerator and serve cold.

We got the idea to put bissap on the blog through the summer and through my lecture about Mauritania, because there, and in other parts of Africa, bissap is a typical drink.

Necessities:

A ladle

2 bowls

A pot / bottle to keep it

A sieve

Ingredients:

1 cup of hibiscus flowers

2 teaspoons of vanilla extract

A few sprigs of mint

1 cup of sugar

For 1 liter

1.5 liters of water

Rinse the hibiscus flowers under running water

Put 1.5 liters of water in a bowl, add the hibiscus flowers and cook for 15 to 25 minutes.

The last 3 minutes that the juice boils, you add mint;

Then you sieve the juice and pour it into the other bowl

Then add 1 cup of sugar and 1 to 2 tablespoons of vanilla extract.

Let it cool well and ready!

To prepare bissap as in Africa we bring a liter of water to the boil and put a cup of dry roselle in it. Immediately stop and let it infuse for ten minutes. Red water seven in a can. It’s not for nothing that the roselle is called red sorrel, Jamaican sorrel or oseille de Guinee in many places. A tea is set and will certainly taste in the coming warm months.